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Fayette County parents were upset recently about the school system’s bringing in a radical LGBT group to train school nurses on “gender identity” issues. But Fayette is only one of many school districts opening the door to sexualization of even young children. A recent example comes from DeKalb County School District (DCSD).

According to a report from Fox 5, Lithonia Middle School recently administered a test in health class asking 6th-graders to respond to questions about “cisgender,” “gender queer,” and “gender fluid,” among other terms created as part of a political rather than scientific agenda. As a diligent parent and rational human being, mom Octavia Parks objected to testing students on fabricated, sexualized nonsense and to usurping parents’ role in explaining these concepts in their own way and on their own timetable.

 

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October 9, 2017 – FoxNews.com – The DeKalb County School District in Georgia is facing backlash after a “sexual identity” assignment was given to the sixth graders of Lithonia Middle School.

The middle school’s health teacher assigned a quiz that defined 10  “sexual identity” terms, such as gay, lesbian, and transgender. The quiz required the sixth graders to identify and differentiate between various sexual orientations and identities, FOX 5 Atlanta reported.

One mother, Octavia Parks, was particularly shocked when her 12-year-old daughter came home with the assignment.

"Why are they teaching that in school?” Parks said. “What does that have to do with life?"

 

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September 12, 2017 – From National Review – Last month, the New York Times “The Upshot” blog ran a piece by Aaron Carroll, a professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. With this piece, Carroll became the latest in a long line of liberal critics of abstinence-based sex-education programs. He mentions that funding for abstinence-based programs increased during the George W. Bush administration. He then cites a number of meta-studies, which purport to show that abstinence-only sex-education classes are ineffective at either reducing or delaying teen sexual activity.

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Programs aren’t “magic bullets,” say researchers

 

Atlanta, December 16, 2016 –New research conducted by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) shows that many “evidence-based” sex education programs are not actually effective, even though they have been promoted as such.  According to this in-depth evaluation, published in the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), “most of the programs had small or insignificant impacts on adolescent behavior.” In fact, 80% of the students in these “evidence-based” programs fared no better or no worse than their peers who were not in the programs. Further, teens in some “evidence-based” programs were even more likely to begin having sex, more likely to engage in oral sex, and more likely to get pregnant than those who were not in the program.

February 24, 2014 – From LoyolaPhoenix.com – It is unfortunate that the recent PHOENIX editorial (“Loyola leaves students sexually unprotected”) on sexual health did not even mention abstinence. Instead, the Editorial Board decided to abdicate personal responsibility and argue that is the job of an educational institution to make sure its students have birth control (even though the editorial pointed out how easily accessible it is). Since the Editorial Board decided not to offer abstinence as a viable way to avoid STDs and unplanned pregnancies, I gladly will.

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